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We Offer Coaching For:

Time Management and Procrastination

Planning , Scheduling, Organizing  and Storage

Assertiveness Training

Social Skills

Active Listening

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Executive Function

and more.

Time Management

TIME MANAGEMENT is the act or process of planning and exercising conscious control over the amount of time spent on specific activities, especially to increase effectiveness, efficiency or productivity. Time management may be aided by a range of skills, tools, and techniques used to manage time when accomplishing specific tasks, projects and goals complying with a due date. Initially, time management referred to just business or work activities, but eventually the term broadened to include personal activities as well. A time management system is a designed combination of processes, tools, techniques, and methods. Usually time management is a necessity in any project development as it determines the project completion time and scope.

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MAJOR THEMES OF TIME MANAGEMENT

Project management:

Time Management can be considered to be a project management subset and is more commonly known as project planning and project scheduling. Time Management has also been identified as one of the core functions identified in project management.

Attention management:

Attention Management relates to the management of cognitive resources, and in particular the time that humans allocate their mind (and organize the minds of their employees) to conduct some activities.

Personal knowledge management: see below (Personal time management).

 

TIME MANAGEMENT APPROACHES

First generation: Reminders based on clocks and watches, but with computer implementation possible; can be used to alert a person when a task is about to be done.

Second generation: Planning and preparation based on a calendar and appointment books; includes setting goals.

Third generation: planning, prioritizing, controlling (using a personal organizer, other paper-based objects, or computer or PDA-based systems) activities on a daily basis. This approach implies spending some time in clarifying values and priorities.

Fourth generation: being efficient and proactive using any of the above tools; places goals and roles as the controlling element of the system and favors importance over urgency.

Procrastination 

In psychology, procrastination refers to the act of replacing more urgent actions with tasks less urgent, or doing something from which one derives enjoyment, and thus putting off impending tasks to a later time.

 

It can be considered a mechanism for coping with the anxiety associated with starting or completing any task or decision. Anxiety is most likely to cause people to procrastinate, however, if they are impulsive.

 

Procrastination may result in stress, a sense of guilt and crisis, severe loss of personal productivity, as well as social disapproval for not meeting responsibilities or commitments. These feelings combined may promote further procrastination.

 

While it is regarded as normal for people to procrastinate to some degree, it becomes a problem when it impedes normal functioning.  Chronic procrastination may be a sign of an underlying psychological disorder. Such procrastinators may have difficulty seeking support due to social stigma and the belief that task-aversion is caused by laziness, low willpower or low ambition.

 

On the other hand many regard procrastination as a useful way of identifying what is important to us personally, i.e. our passions,  as it is rare to procrastinate when one truly values the task at hand.

 
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